Remembrance 2011

Remembrance 2011 – remembering the brave and heroic who fought and who were lost in war.

I get completely tongue-tied when it comes to writing about war and Remembrance. So instead, here’s some photographs of a few of my relatives. Some of whom made it, others who weren’t so lucky.

Ernest Edward Thomas Dewey - 1st World War

Ernest Edward Thomas Dewey (1896-1991)

Albert Martin (1899-1918)

Owen Newman (1919-1944)

Herbert Martin (1884-1917)

Herbert Martin's gravestone

Owen Yarrow (1882-1917)

Owen Yarrow

Remembrance: Albert Martin

Remembrance of Albert Martin (1899-1918) who died in a hospital in Germany.

Albert Martin (1899-1918)
Albert Martin (1899-1918)

Albert Martin (65727) enlisted as a Private for the 1st/5th Batallion of the Northumberland Fusiliers.

He went to fight in the First World War but was sadly taken prisoner during the German’s third offensive that swept through Fismes, France on 27th May 1918.

Records from the Comité International de la Croix-Rouge (CICR) revealed that he was captured the following day at Fismes.

He is recorded as present at a Prisoner of War (POW) camp in Dülmen, coming from Laon on 19th July 1918. He then appears at the POW camp at Münster II on 20th August 1918.

He died 10 days later in the “Res.Laz.Abtl.Krankenhaus” (hospital) at Homberg, Germany.

He was buried in an English cemetery in the same place “Feld” 21, Nr.64.5″

Remembrance: Owen Yarrow

A series of images of brave soldiers who fought in the First and Second World Wars.

Owen Yarrow (1882-1917)
Owen Yarrow (1882-1917)

Owen worked as a Postman and had to carry mail to the front lines during the 1st World War.

It was during the battle at Cumbrai, France, that he was sadly killed. None of his personal possessions were recovered.

He served with the 5th Suffolk Regiment and the 1st Battalion Post Office Rifles.

Remembrance

Royal British Legion logoToday – the 11th of November at 11am, large areas of the UK were silent to remember the bravest people and animals who had lost their lives during wars.

I wear my poppy with pride, and always try to observe the 2 minute silence at 11:00 11/11/XX each year, but to be honest, I think about those heroes almost every other day and think about the lives that have tragically been lost due to war.

The First World War was savage. Rarely did a family or parish remain unscathed and that was certainly the case with mine, and this affects me even though I never met these people, and now that there are no known surviving WWI veterans, I will never know for sure what it was like. Losing a sibling, a parent, a child, or other family member to war must be heartbreaking.

If you feel the same way, please consider supporting The Royal British Legion