Relationship Calculator

Getting lost in the branches? Here’s a handy relationship calculator from the team at Crestleaf to help you work out your family tree.

I often get emails in response to my website or this blog, or through sites like Ancestry, from distant relatives. Naturally I am fascinated to work out the relationship between us, but it can be really tricky to do so.

Probably like a few of you this long Easter weekend, you’ll be spending time with family, and inevitably talking about ‘the tree’. My mother often asks if i’ve discovered anything new, but I often watch her eyes glaze over as she gets lost after about the third step when I’m trying to describe how one of those distant relatives is related.

A couple of days ago, Mark Subel from the team over at Crestleaf, sent me a handy chart that helps make it clearer, so I thought I’d share this with you here to help you overcome those glazed eye responses too…

Crest leaf Family Relationship Chart

Print it out, pin it, stick it your fridge, or save it to your iPad (i’ll be doing that for Who Do You Think You Are? Live in a couple of weeks).

You can right click the image above, or download it (588Kb) here.

INFOGRAPHIC: The life expectancy of a Martin descendant

I’ve been crunching data again, and following on from my previous infographics, this time it’s the turn of my own surname – Martin. How do the life statistics stack up?

The Martin surname life expectancy infographic

There’s a few things evident from this infographic:

  • The average life-span of a Martin descendant is lower
  • Winter weddings are popular with Martins
  • Winter children are common with Martins
  • Martin men most commonly die around agricultural calendars (May and September)

Maybe the last three are connected? Is data showing that the agricultural occupations of the male Martin name-bearers was central to their home lives?

As for the age of death for men, fitting in with agricultural calendars – there may be some truth in this, similar to the parallel decline in UK heavy industry and the increase in male life expectancy in the 1980s.

As for me, well, it looks like that statistically i’ve got about 16 years left, will have one child, still have time to marry, and will probably die at one of my birthday parties (May).

I look forward to skewing the figures (the good way!).

INFOGRAPHIC: My birth, marriage, and death certificate buying habits

An infographic showing how I split my attention and money on birth, marriage, and death certificates. The results of this were a complete surprise.

Turns out, I love death certificates, and spend most of my money using certificates to research my father’s family side. Who knew!?

BMD infographic

The Cross family infographic

The Cross family infographic – sharing stats based descendants from Thomas Cross and his wife Ann of 17th Century Ely, Cambridgeshire, England, including family members who emigrated to Australia in the 19th Century.

Riding on the back of the success of my previous (and first) infographic for The Barber family, which provided me with my most popular (traffic-wise) post ever on this blog, and a terrific amount of Facebook shares, here’s my second one featuring my Cross family.

The family are predominantly based within Cambridgeshire, but the data also includes a the many that emigrated to Australia in the mid-nineteenth century.

The Cross family infographic

The Barber family infographic

Combining my love for genealogy and infographics – yes! it’s a genealogy infographic.

I’d been looking for an excuse to combine my love for infographics (small chunks of information delivered as graphics) with my love for genealogy, and now I’ve achieved it. Here’s my first attempt at combining the two.

Using the data buried in my Reunion10 Mac software (see Reports > Statistics), I’ve managed to pull some key figures from the data I have against my maternal Barber family in a bid to make genealogy that little bit more interesting for those relatives who nod and smile when you start talking about ‘the tree’ and hand them a print out showing names of people they’ve never heard of. Maybe this format will help capture their interest and give them some interesting/quirky facts to remember.

An infographic showing Barber family data
An infographic created using my Barber family data.

I had quite a bit of fun making this, so will probably create some more in due course.

Click the image if you want to see a larger version.